Difference between revisions of "Head Coverings"

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==Head Covering==
+
==Head Coverings==
 
{{Quote|…any woman who prays or prophesies with her head unveiled disgraces her head—it is one and the same thing as having her head shaved. For if a woman will not veil herself, then she should cut off her hair; but if it is disgraceful for a woman to have her hair cut off or to be shaved, she should wear a veil.|St. Paul, Letter to the Corinthians}}
 
{{Quote|…any woman who prays or prophesies with her head unveiled disgraces her head—it is one and the same thing as having her head shaved. For if a woman will not veil herself, then she should cut off her hair; but if it is disgraceful for a woman to have her hair cut off or to be shaved, she should wear a veil.|St. Paul, Letter to the Corinthians}}
  
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===Wimples or Veils worn with Headbands or circlets===
 
===Wimples or Veils worn with Headbands or circlets===
'''[[RICH]] [[Mid]]'''<br>
+
'''[[RICH]] [[Mid]] ([[RESTRICTED]])'''<br>
 
Occasional depictions show either gold, embroidered textile or brocaded tablet weave bands being worn over the head covering. As the depictions are rare and hard to interpret they are discouraged in Regia. Head bands of either gold, embroidered textile or brocaded tablet weave may only be worn by women portraying RICH characters and the band must be of extremely high status.  
 
Occasional depictions show either gold, embroidered textile or brocaded tablet weave bands being worn over the head covering. As the depictions are rare and hard to interpret they are discouraged in Regia. Head bands of either gold, embroidered textile or brocaded tablet weave may only be worn by women portraying RICH characters and the band must be of extremely high status.  
 
{{Pin|
 
{{Pin|
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   |Image= London, British Library MS Cotton Claudius B IV Woman.jpg
 
   |Image= London, British Library MS Cotton Claudius B IV Woman.jpg
 
   |Title= Wimple with circlet   
 
   |Title= Wimple with circlet   
 +
  |Height-Img=250px
 
   |Height-Text=80px
 
   |Height-Text=80px
 
   |By= London, British Library MS Cotton Claudius B IV Woman.jpg
 
   |By= London, British Library MS Cotton Claudius B IV Woman.jpg
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   |Image= London, British Library, MS Stowe 944 fol.6r - Queen.jpg
 
   |Image= London, British Library, MS Stowe 944 fol.6r - Queen.jpg
 
   |Title= Wimple with emerging Headbands   
 
   |Title= Wimple with emerging Headbands   
 +
  |Height-Img=250px
 
   |Height-Text=80px
 
   |Height-Text=80px
 
   |By= London, British Library, MS Stowe 944 fol.6r
 
   |By= London, British Library, MS Stowe 944 fol.6r
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{{Pin|
 
{{Pin|
 
{{Pin-Tile
 
{{Pin-Tile
   |Image= E-C-LouA-GA.JPG
+
   |Image= Carolingian Dress by Louise Archer © Gavin Archer.jpg
 
   |Title=Open Palla  
 
   |Title=Open Palla  
 
   |Height-Img=250px   
 
   |Height-Img=250px   
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}}
 
}}
  
==Cap==
+
==English Cap==
A simple cloth cap often tied or perhaps pinned in place.
 
 
 
===English Cap===
 
 
'''[[POOR]] All Periods'''<br>
 
'''[[POOR]] All Periods'''<br>
English caps are slightly larger than their Viking equivalent so that it can cover more of the hair as dictated by Christian doctrine. For English women they are generally considered to be working items and so can only be worn on the Wic.<br>
+
A simple cloth cap often tied or perhaps pinned in place. English caps are slightly larger than their Viking equivalent so that it can cover more of the hair as dictated by Christian doctrine. For English women they are generally considered to be working items and so can only be worn on the Wic.{{Pin|
 
 
===Viking Cap===
 
'''[[Very Early]] to [[Early]]'''<br>
 
Also called Coppergate or Dublin caps. These may be worn by Vikings on or off the Wic.<br>
 
Sizes vary between 14x38cm (5½“x15”) to 18x59cm (7“x23¼”).<br>
 
Viking women have the option of wearing caps made from wool, linen or even silk as an alternative to going bare haired and are not restricted to just wearing them on the Wic.
 
{{Pin|
 
 
{{Pin-Tile
 
{{Pin-Tile
   |Image= Cap - Steph (MS).jpg
+
   |Image= Cap by Steph Everest © Mike South.jpg
 
   |Title=English Cap
 
   |Title=English Cap
 
   |Height-Img=150px
 
   |Height-Img=150px
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   |By=by Steph Everest
 
   |By=by Steph Everest
 
   |Caption = Generic style}}
 
   |Caption = Generic style}}
 +
}}
 +
 +
 +
==Viking Cap==
 +
'''[[Very Early]] to [[Early]]'''<br>
 +
Also called Coppergate or Dublin caps. These may be worn by Vikings on or off the Wic.<br>
 +
A simple cloth cap often tied or perhaps pinned in place. Sizes vary between 14x38cm (5½“x15”) to 18x59cm (7“x23¼”).<br>
 +
Viking women have the option of wearing caps made from wool, linen or even silk as an alternative to going bare haired and are not restricted to just wearing them on the Wic.
 +
{{Pin|
 
{{Pin-Tile
 
{{Pin-Tile
 
   |Image= Cap - Louise (GA).jpg
 
   |Image= Cap - Louise (GA).jpg
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   |Height-Text=80px
 
   |Height-Text=80px
 
   |By=by Louise Archer
 
   |By=by Louise Archer
   |Caption = Worn by [[Viking]] women}}
+
   |Caption = }}
 
}}
 
}}
  
==Headscarf==
+
==English Headscarf==
 
 
===English Headscarf===
 
 
'''[[POOR]] All Periods [[Allowable]]'''<Br>
 
'''[[POOR]] All Periods [[Allowable]]'''<Br>
 
The drawing to the left is from Almgeren’s ‘The Viking’, published in 1966, where he introduced the idea of Viking women wearing a simple headscarf.
 
The drawing to the left is from Almgeren’s ‘The Viking’, published in 1966, where he introduced the idea of Viking women wearing a simple headscarf.
 
Currently we have neither artistic nor archaeological evidence to support such a garment. It is allowed purely because some sort of simple head covering must have been worn by the POOR to cover their hair.
 
Currently we have neither artistic nor archaeological evidence to support such a garment. It is allowed purely because some sort of simple head covering must have been worn by the POOR to cover their hair.
 
===Viking Headscarf or Headband===
 
A simple rectangle of cloth that can either be worn as a headscarf or by folding it into thirds, as a headband. The short ends of the rectangle are usually tasselled. May be worn by Vikings on or off the Wic.<br>
 
Sizes vary between 15x60cm (6“x23½”) to 24x70cm (9½“x27½”).
 
 
 
{{Pin|
 
{{Pin|
 
{{Pin-Tile
 
{{Pin-Tile
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   |By= [[(RA)]]
 
   |By= [[(RA)]]
 
   |Caption = Generic style}}
 
   |Caption = Generic style}}
 +
{{Pin-Tile
 +
  |Image= Viking headscarf (Almgeren 1966).jpg
 +
  |Title=English Headscarf ([[Allowable]])
 +
  |Height-Img=150px
 +
  |Height-Text=80px
 +
  |By= [[(FU)]]
 +
  |Caption = after Almgeren 1966}}
 +
}}
 +
 +
==Viking Headscarf==
 +
'''[[VIKING]] [[Very Early]] to [[Early]]'''<br>
 +
A simple rectangle of cloth that can either be worn as a headscarf or by folding it into thirds, as a headband. The short ends of the rectangle are usually tasselled. May be worn by Vikings on or off the Wic.<br>
 +
Sizes vary between 15x60cm (6“x23½”) to 24x70cm (9½“x27½”).
 +
 +
{{Pin|
 
{{Pin-Tile
 
{{Pin-Tile
 
   |Image= Scarf - Louise (GA).jpg
 
   |Image= Scarf - Louise (GA).jpg
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Although we have little evidence for women wearing hoods they are allowed to provide another alternative if, for instance, a wimple or veil is unavailable. They are also useful for women who have just come off the battle field. Please note that women wearing hoods is not encouraged.
 
Although we have little evidence for women wearing hoods they are allowed to provide another alternative if, for instance, a wimple or veil is unavailable. They are also useful for women who have just come off the battle field. Please note that women wearing hoods is not encouraged.
  
==Bare hair==
+
==Viking Bare hair==
 
'''[[VIKING]] [[Very Early]] to [[Early]] ''([[RESTRICTED]])'' '''<br>
 
'''[[VIKING]] [[Very Early]] to [[Early]] ''([[RESTRICTED]])'' '''<br>
 
Viking women do not have to cover their hair provided a full Hangerock set is worn and the member’s hair is at least shoulder length and naturally coloured.
 
Viking women do not have to cover their hair provided a full Hangerock set is worn and the member’s hair is at least shoulder length and naturally coloured.
 +
{{Pin|
 +
{{Pin-Tile
 +
  |Image= Viking style hair - Louise (GA).jpg
 +
  |Title= Viking Hair Style
 +
  |Height-Img=150px
 +
  |Height-Text=80px
 +
  |By= by Louise Archer
 +
  |Caption = }}
 +
}}
  
==Sprang Hairnet==
+
==Viking Sprang Hairnet==
 
'''[[VIKING]] [[Very Early]] to [[Early]] ''([[Allowable]])'' ''([[RESTRICTED]])'' '''<br>
 
'''[[VIKING]] [[Very Early]] to [[Early]] ''([[Allowable]])'' ''([[RESTRICTED]])'' '''<br>
 
Bare hair held up in a ‘bun’ by the use of a sprang hairnet. The same restrictions apply as for bare hair above.
 
Bare hair held up in a ‘bun’ by the use of a sprang hairnet. The same restrictions apply as for bare hair above.
 +
 +
{{Pin|
 +
{{Pin-Tile
 +
  |Image= Sprang Hairnet by Steph Everest ©Jason Rogers.jpg
 +
  |Title= Sprang Hairnet
 +
  |Height-Img=150px
 +
  |Height-Text=80px
 +
  |By= by Steph Everest
 +
  |Caption = }}
 +
}}
  
 
==Open Veil==
 
==Open Veil==
 
'''[[Angevin]]'''<br>
 
'''[[Angevin]]'''<br>
 +
{{Pin|
 +
{{Pin-Tile
 +
  |Image= Huntarian Psalter.jpg
 +
  |Title= Open Veil
 +
  |Height-Img=150px
 +
  |Height-Text=80px
 +
  |By= Huntarian Psalter
 +
  |Caption = }}
 +
}}
  
 
==Barbette==
 
==Barbette==

Latest revision as of 19:18, 14 January 2018

Head Coverings

Head Coverings

…any woman who prays or prophesies with her head unveiled disgraces her head—it is one and the same thing as having her head shaved. For if a woman will not veil herself, then she should cut off her hair; but if it is disgraceful for a woman to have her hair cut off or to be shaved, she should wear a veil.
St. Paul, Letter to the Corinthians

All women and girls who have passed puberty must cover the tops of their heads. A simple headscarf is sufficient for “domestic” purposes, such as working around a fire.

However, for “going out” or performing high status activities (such as embroidering or music) a more formal style of head covering must be worn over a cap or scarf. All outer coverings should partially cover the lower neck and breast bone; a good rule of thumb is that they should hide the neckline of the dress underneath and no hair should really be easily visible.

No circlets or bands should be worn over the head covering. Embroidery is for RICH English only and is only found on headbands worn under the head covering. Simple decorative stitching is allowed, but most outer coverings should to be plain and ideally of natural or bleached linen or wool. It is worth noting however that pure white linen is considered RICH.

So basically a lady should wear a head covering consisting of two parts, a base layer that may be a cap, headscarf or headband. Over this should be worn the outer covering of a wimple or veil that is typically pinned in place.

Veil

All Periods
A piece of cloth that is wrapped around the head and shoulders as a covering and is usually pinned to a cap or band beneath. Veils should be worn in such a way as to cover the hair and neckline.

Veil

Veil

Wimple

All Periods (but really Mid to Very Late
A simple shaped head covering that is sewn together like a small hood and covers the hair and neckline.

Wimple

Wimple

Small Wimples

POOR Mid to Very Late
Basically the same as a normal wimple but sized to cover less of the shoulders and back. Worn by POOR women and servants.

Small Wimple

Small Wimple

Wimples or Veils worn with Headbands or circlets

RICH Mid (RESTRICTED)
Occasional depictions show either gold, embroidered textile or brocaded tablet weave bands being worn over the head covering. As the depictions are rare and hard to interpret they are discouraged in Regia. Head bands of either gold, embroidered textile or brocaded tablet weave may only be worn by women portraying RICH characters and the band must be of extremely high status.

Wimple with circlet

Wimple with circlet
London, British Library MS Cotton Claudius B IV Woman.jpg

Wimples or Veils with long emerging Headbands

RICH Mid to Very Late
Elaborate headbands [RICH] may have some decoration and long 'tails' that hang down the front or back under the head covering. Headbands hide the hairline.

Wimple with emerging Headbands

Wimple with emerging Headbands
London, British Library, MS Stowe 944 fol.6r

Palla

Very Early to Early
A large rectangle of cloth worn draped over the head and pinned at the throat with a brooch.

Open Palla Worn with a Carolingian Style Dress

Open Palla
Worn with a Carolingian Style Dress
by Louise Archer (GA)

Closed Palla

Closed Palla
London, British Library, MS Cotton Galba A XVIII fol.120v (GA)

Closed Palla

Closed Palla
by Louise Archer (GA)

English Cap

POOR All Periods

A simple cloth cap often tied or perhaps pinned in place. English caps are slightly larger than their Viking equivalent so that it can cover more of the hair as dictated by Christian doctrine. For English women they are generally considered to be working items and so can only be worn on the Wic.
English Cap Generic style

English Cap
Generic style
by Steph Everest


Viking Cap

Very Early to Early
Also called Coppergate or Dublin caps. These may be worn by Vikings on or off the Wic.
A simple cloth cap often tied or perhaps pinned in place. Sizes vary between 14x38cm (5½“x15”) to 18x59cm (7“x23¼”).
Viking women have the option of wearing caps made from wool, linen or even silk as an alternative to going bare haired and are not restricted to just wearing them on the Wic.

Viking Cap

Viking Cap
by Louise Archer

English Headscarf

POOR All Periods Allowable
The drawing to the left is from Almgeren’s ‘The Viking’, published in 1966, where he introduced the idea of Viking women wearing a simple headscarf. Currently we have neither artistic nor archaeological evidence to support such a garment. It is allowed purely because some sort of simple head covering must have been worn by the POOR to cover their hair.

English Headscarf Generic style

English Headscarf
Generic style

English Headscarf (Allowable) after Almgeren 1966

English Headscarf (Allowable)
after Almgeren 1966

Viking Headscarf

VIKING Very Early to Early
A simple rectangle of cloth that can either be worn as a headscarf or by folding it into thirds, as a headband. The short ends of the rectangle are usually tasselled. May be worn by Vikings on or off the Wic.
Sizes vary between 15x60cm (6“x23½”) to 24x70cm (9½“x27½”).

Viking Headscarf Worn by Viking women

Viking Headscarf
Worn by Viking women
by Louise Archer

Hoods

All Periods (Allowable)
Although we have little evidence for women wearing hoods they are allowed to provide another alternative if, for instance, a wimple or veil is unavailable. They are also useful for women who have just come off the battle field. Please note that women wearing hoods is not encouraged.

Viking Bare hair

VIKING Very Early to Early (RESTRICTED)
Viking women do not have to cover their hair provided a full Hangerock set is worn and the member’s hair is at least shoulder length and naturally coloured.

Viking Hair Style

Viking Hair Style
by Louise Archer

Viking Sprang Hairnet

VIKING Very Early to Early (Allowable) (RESTRICTED)
Bare hair held up in a ‘bun’ by the use of a sprang hairnet. The same restrictions apply as for bare hair above.

Sprang Hairnet

Sprang Hairnet
by Steph Everest

Open Veil

Angevin

Open Veil

Open Veil
Huntarian Psalter

Barbette

Angevin

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Women's Clothing




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