Cloaks and Coats (Women's)

Cloaks

A cloak made from a simple rectangle of cloth. Before 980AD they are worn by all social classes. After this mantles seem to be preferred by women of improved status until the late C12th when cloaks come back into fashion. Cloaks must not be lined in a different coloured material.

Generic Cloak AD 793-1215

Generic Cloak
AD 793-1215
by Louise Archer

Generic Cloak AD 793-1215

Generic Cloak
AD 793-1215
British Lib. Cotton Vespadian A VIII fol.2v

Mantels

The mantle is an un-split garment of approximate cone shape, with a hole for the head at the point. It is worn like a poncho, and should reach mid-calf when worn loose.

When a mantle is worn, the head covering must sit over it. The front of the mantle may be belted with a wide sash made from the same cloth as the mantle in order to free the arms.

Mantel

Mantel
by Kat Dearden

Mantel

Mantel
London, British Library, MS Cotton Cleopatra C VIII fol.7v

Viking Back-trains

Viking Back-train

Viking Back-train
by Louise Archer (AT)

Viking Coats

A Viking Woman’s coat may only be worn over a full Hangerock set. This should be closed by the use of a single disc, trefoil or equal armed brooch. No buttoned coats are allowed.

Viking Coat

Viking Coat
by Catherine Stallybrass (AT)

Viking Coat

Viking Coat
by Helen Bowstead-Stallybrass (AT)

Angevin Cloaks

Angevin Cloaks are worn on the shoulders and are clasped at the front with a chain. Angevin Cloaks can be lined in a different coloured material unlike Generic Cloaks.

Angevin Cloak AD 1180-1215

Angevin Cloak
AD 1180-1215
by Kat Dearden


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